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Home | Events Archive | Highway Traffic Control via Smart e-Mobility
Seminar

Highway Traffic Control via Smart e-Mobility


  • Location
    Online
  • Date and time

    June 24, 2021
    14:00 - 15:00

If you are interested in joining the seminar, please send an email to Daniel Haerle or Sacha den Nijs.

Abstract: In this talk, we study how to alleviate highway traffic congestion by encouraging plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles to stop at a charging station around peak congestion time. Specifically, we design a pricing policy to make the charging price dynamic and dependent on the traffic congestion, predicted via the cell transmission model, and the availability of charging spots. Furthermore, we develop a novel framework to model how this policy affects the drivers' decisions by formulating a mixed-integer potential game. Technically, we introduce the concept of "road-to-station" (r2s) and "station-to-road" (s2r) flows and show that the selfish actions of the drivers converge to charging schedules that are individually optimal in the sense of Nash. Then, we validate the proposed strategy on a simulated highway stretch between The Hague and Rotterdam, in The Netherlands. And carefully analyze how the parameters involved influence the decision-making process.

Authors: Carlo Cenedese, Michele Cucuzzella, Jacquelien M. A. Scherpen, Sergio Grammatico, Ming Cao

Papers on which the talk is based on:

Highway Traffic Control via Smart e-Mobility -- Part I: Theory

Highway Traffic Control via Smart e-Mobility -- Part II: Dutch A13 Case Study

Another related paper:

Charging plug-in electric vehicles as a mixed-integer aggregative game