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Home | Events Archive | Small and Large Firms Over the Business Cycle
Seminar

Small and Large Firms Over the Business Cycle


  • Series
    Research on Monday
  • Speaker(s)
    Neil Mehrotra (Brown University, United States
  • Field
    Macroeconomics
  • Location
    Erasmus University, Theil Building, Room C1-2
    Rotterdam
  • Date and time

    October 14, 2019
    12:00 - 13:00

Abstract:

Drawing on a new, confidential Census Bureau dataset of financial statements of a representative sample of 80000 manufacturing firms from 1977 and 2014, we provide new evidence on the link between size, cyclicality, and financial frictions. First, we only find evidence of lower cyclicality among the very largest firms (the top 1% by size). Second, due to high and rising concentration of sales and investment, the lower sensitivity of the top 1% firms dominates the behavior of aggregate fluctuations. Third, we show that this differential sensitivity does not appear to be driven by financial frictions. The higher sensitivity of the bottom 99% does not disappear after controlling for measures of financial strength, is not statistically significant after identified monetary policy shocks, and does not appear in debt financing flows. Evidence from 3-digit industries suggests a non-financial explanation: the largest 1% of firms are less sensitive due to a more diversified customer base.